Tag Archives: women

Happy (Late) International Women’s Day To Our Stay At Home Moms

9 Mar

In honor of National Women’s Day, I was planning on finding a super-empowering TedTalk from some super fabulous woman CEO sharing her story about how she became so awesome.

And I’ll maybe probably still do that, but today, I’m gunna do something a little different.

When you think about International Women’s Day, you think about that female CEO who’s broken through the glass ceiling and now making loads of money.

And to those women… you’re doing awesome. Hopefully I’ll get there someday… if that’s what I want.

But what you don’t think much about are the women who aren’t in an office…

The women who instead of being dressed in kick ass power suits, are likely covered in baby throw up right now.

Mommas.

Stay at home mommas.

They’re often forgotten about when we’re talking about the empowerment of women.

And really, they shouldn’t be.

Because their jobs are just as hard- if not harder.

I was with a baby this weekend. I held it and it threw up on me. And it smelled bad. And I returned the baby to her owner. To her mom. And her parents talked to me about all the gross disgusting things their baby does and how they have to change diapers 54 times a day and wash the baby with a hose because her poop travels out of her diaper.

OUT OF HER DIAPER!

So today, instead of talking about the female executives that I admire, I’m going to do this…

THANK YOU MOMMA BEAR.

Because you stayed home with me my whole life and you dealt with my tantrums and you cleaned my butt and you fed me nasty food that I’m sure I threw up several times.

Thank you because you took me to every single one of my gymnastics and cheerleading and dance practices.

Thank you because you were on every single field trip and I know that most of them must have been super boring but you went anyway because I asked you to.

Thank you because you didn’t send me to summer camp. Because there was nothing that I wanted more than to just stay home with you and my sister every summer. I didn’t want to have to go be social with weird kids that I didn’t know. Even though you threatened us that one year and physically took us there and we sat in the car in the parking lot and we cried, thanks for feeling sorry enough for us that you just turned around and went back home.

You’re kind of awesome.

So for all the mommas out there who think they need a corner office and a power suit to be appreciated, I promise you, you don’t.

You stay at home mommas do so much more than you know.

And I think it’s time that you’re recognized just as much as a CEO.

Because hell, you run a family.

And God knows that’s not easy.

Stay at home mom

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Yea, This #AskHerMore Campaign is Pretty Freaking Awesome

23 Feb

ask her more

Last night I learned about the #Askhermore campaign, and as a young professional woman, I have to say that I couldn’t be happier about it. It freaking rocks.

So for those of you who are sitting there like, “what the heck is this #askhermore thing”… open up a new tab on your computer, google #askhermore, and then come back and finish reading this.

Okay, so why is this important? I think it’s pretty obvious. The #askhermore campaign is a movement that’s meant to raise awareness and to cause reporters to ask not-so-fashion-related questions on the RedCarpet. Instead of just commenting on the jewlery that’s being worn and the designer gowns, this social media campaign is asking that we place more emphasis on the amazing work that these actresses are doing.

Now sure, I’m the first one to say that I love fashion. I like pretty things. But do I think that the talent these women possess should have to be overshadowed by society’s interest in their ability to pick out a pretty outfit?

Not so much.

Us women are so much more than our outfit-coordinating skills. We’re smart. We’re powerful. We have tons to offer. And it’s a shame really that when we enter the workforce, we’re often looked at…up and down, the general perception being that a negative correlation exists between our intelligence and the height of our heels.

If we dress well, we can’t possibly be smart. If we’re fashionable, we’re obviously just trying to impress the men.

That’s really typically the general perception, and I’m telling you…it’s bullshit.

I’ve dealt with it before. I’m quite confident I’ll deal with it all my life. But I can promise you that I’ll fight it every step of the way.

Like the story I’ve told before about my college professor. Why is it that if I have nice legs I can’t be taken seriously?

So let’s start treating women like the well-rounded individuals that they are. Let’s ask women about the things that inspire them. Let’s ask them about their goals, their passions, their careers. Let’s ask them about the struggles they’ve overcome. Heck- ask them about the things that excite them. But don’t just ask them about their outfits. Let’s be a little more creative.

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Young Women in the Workforce

11 May

So here’s the deal…

It’s rough being young and in the workforce.

But it appears that young WOMEN have it the hardest.

Why?

Because not only do we have to prove ourselves capable despite our age, but despite our gender too.

This is not okay.

I mean really, why is the notion that we’re young, intelligent women, so ridiculous? What do we have to do to gain respect from both our male and female colleagues?

It’s true that we’re young.

But we’re also hungry, ambitious, and yes, contrary to popular belief, many of us are smart.

Check out my full article featured in Urbane Sophisticate’s Women’s Issue——> here.

If you’re a young woman in the workforce, you may relate.

And if you’re not, you should still be aware of the hardships that we face.

Then, start taking us seriously.

*******************************************************************************************************

From Urbane Sophisticate’s Women’s Issue:

by: Kayla Cruz

I should have known that being a young woman in the workforce was not going to be easy. There were particularly obvious signs: my first, which I completely disregarded, took place my sophomore year in college. I remember sitting in class, making up an exam when my professor came up to me, a bit too close for comfort, and said, “You know, you’re going to have a hard time being taken seriously at work with legs like that.” I assure you he said that. Two years later, when interviewing for a new job, the hiring manager (who was a woman, for the record) looked at me, in my tailored Calvin Klein business dress, and said, “I’d like to hire you. But we’re going to have to put you in scrubs. I won’t have you walking around with those legs.”  That was my first career lesson: my legs are an issue.

It seems that Gen Y women entering the workforce today face a tremendous challenge in being taken seriously as professionals. Not only do we have to deal with negative stereotypes regarding our young age, but we also have to navigate the workforce as women and unfortunately, regardless of how far we’ve come, there are still some people that undermine our ability to take our careers seriously.

Most of us attend college for four years in hopes of landing our dream jobs upon graduating. We dream of making a difference, and becoming successful and powerful women, a goal we know that we’re perfectly capable of achieving. However, what we discover when we enter the workforce often does not meet up to these expectations. We find instead that most organizations are severely flawed in their infrastructures and make it nearly impossible for young women to attain the acknowledgement that they deserve. I know that for me, that was certainly the case.  I entered a male dominated workforce where I was perceived as an object of desire, incapable of possessing intellect. The understanding that I was a young and smart woman did not exist.

Nearly nothing I learned in college prepared me for what I encountered as a young woman in the workforce. During my first year as a professional, I faced sexual harassment on a daily basis. When men would approach me, it was hardly ever to talk about work, and it was never in a serious manner. They failed to respect me as an intellectual and that upset me. While I was flattered that men perceived me as desirable, what I wanted more than anything was to be acknowledged for my talents and the knowledge that I possessed.

This longing to be respected in our careers that we, as Generation Y, bring to the workforce is not a bad thing. However, when added to our naiveté, it makes us prime targets for sexual harassment, which I learned first hand. In this case, one that occurs way too often, a young woman becomes frustrated because no one seems to respect her work. Then comes along a male superior who assures her that he does see her value. He then takes a “special interest” in her and ensures that her career development is given high priority.  She is given new projects and challenging work and she is happy until said superior is calling her at 3 a.m. demanding her resignation because she failed to report to his apartment that evening. 

To add to this is the sad reality that a young woman is seldom able to take credit for her success. As she advances in her career, she is automatically perceived as “the girl that slept with her boss.”  It is seemingly unfathomable that a young woman may succeed based on her own hard work.  What people struggle to understand is that women are just as capable as men in the workforce.  Add to that factor a young age and it is nearly impossible to be taken seriously, to be perceived as anything other than an executive’s secretary. I don’t aspire to be a secretary. I want much more than that and I will spend my entire career making sure that I am known for my intellect and the outstanding work I produce, not just for my legs.

Being young in the workforce today is difficult. Generation Y is striving to make employers aware of the fact that they are capable of doing serious work, beyond the process of making copies and other clerical duties. They yearn for challenging work and want to be seen as equal teammates by their colleagues. It appears that young women have it the hardest. We have to prove ourselves capable despite our age and our gender. But why is the notion that we are young, intelligent women, so ridiculous? What do we have to do to gain respect from both our male and female colleagues? It is true that we are young, but we are also hungry, ambitious, and yes, contrary to popular belief, many of us are smart.

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