Tag Archives: workplace

5 Things You Can Do to Fall in Love with Your Job Again

19 Feb

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Some days I feel like breaking up with my job. Big time. It’s not you…it’s me…

Actually it IS you, and I need to get out of here. It’s just not working anymore.

We all have those days. Days when we seriously consider jumping out the window in the coffee break room.

You’re not giong to love your job every day. If you do, consider yourself super lucky.

So the trick is to learn how to fall back in love with it, and today’s guest blogger Naomi Shaw shares with us just how to do that. Enjoy!

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When you’ve started a new job, you feel like the world is at your fingertips. You’re at the very beginning of an exciting new journey, so things are great. But once you’ve done the same job for many long months or years, the passion and joy can begin to fade. It happens.

In many cases, jobs just get boring because of the routine, and it isn’t uncommon for people to feel burned out. But to avoid this, you probably just need to find ways to make your job fun again. Yes…fun.

So use these five tips to help you fall in love with your job again, because you liked it when you first started, and you can like it again.

1. Learn something new that you can use in your job. There are a variety of ways to do this, from going back to school to seeking an advanced degree to simply buying a few books that can help you in your career.

Whatever you do, pursuing interesting facts about your chosen profession can help make your work more interesting and rewarding when it’s starting to feel like you’re just going about the same routine day after day.

 2. Look for a mentor to help you learn more about your career. When a job gets tiresome and a bit boring, it might be a good time to learn more about your profession and what it has to offer.

Meeting with a mentor can help you discover new opportunities to pursue in your current job.It’s also helpful to learn from somebody who’s likely been where you are right now. Bored, over it, and looking for their next step.

3. Question your expectations and set goals. If you once loved your job and it’s just not giving you the satisfaction it used to, there could be a good reason for that. Perhaps you thought you’d have more responsibility by now, or that your role with a company would have changed over time.

Knowing what you expect from your job, and knowing whether or not it’s something you can feasibly work toward can boost your focus. It can give you back some control, making work less of a chore and more of a chosen path again.

4. Knock difficult tasks out of the way first. Perhaps that sounds like an awful way to start the day, but if you spend every second at the office waiting until the end of the day to make that painful call or finish paperwork, you’re going to dread each and every second of every day!

Take care of tasks you don’t like in the morning. You’ll go home after doing things you enjoy more, which can make it a lot easier to look forward to the next day at work.

5.Stay positive. It might sound like silly advice, but simply putting on a smile in the morning and reminding yourself that you used to love your job is sometimes all it takes to fight the boredom and repetition.

Keeping a positive mindset can also help you perform better at work, increasing your chances for advancement and more fulfilling positions.

For many people, work can feel like something they do every day just to pay the bills. But it can be much more rewarding that. Getting your passion back takes some work, but it’s worth it. Because when you’re passionate about your work, you enjoy every day –even the work days – a lot more.

Naomi Shaw is a stay-at-home mom in Southern California. She enjoys blogging about DIY crafts and mommy tips, providing insight, advice and more!  She hopes you enjoy this article.

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In A Super Negative World, Challenge Yourself to Stay Positive

10 Sep

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Today’s guest post was written by Colleen Garvin. She’s really quite wonderful and her message is a great one: all this negativity….it’s killing us. So let’s try to look on the bright side. Let’s try to be optimistic, and make a difference at work. Because doing anything other than that, is kind of terrible. Enjoy!

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“I’ve been here for a decade”

“We’ve tried that before”

 “Oh just wait, you’ll become jaded”

“That’s cute… how optimistic you are..”

“That’s what we did and it didn’t work so we can’t try that again”

 “That’s the future, that’s not now”

 “We don’t want to be overly ambitious”

OR

“Push through it!”

“Don’t give in to the drama”

“Work your ass off and you will see results”

“If you don’t like something, change it!”

“If it didn’t work before, learn from the mistake and take a new approach”

 “Everything can be improved, including yourself”

Welcome to the professional world of an individual born in the late 80’s!

1988 to be exact. I am one of those people who was definitely over extended in my collegiate career and wanted to make sure I was doing everything correctly. I graduated in 4 years exactly after being in charge of two major college groups and was immediately placed in a corporate position. I was given more projects than my pay grade simply because I wanted them; I asked for them. The worst thing you can do is bore me.

You know what I wasn’t expecting on those collegiate evenings? A slew of negativity that would come from “experienced” workers. The quotes provided are real, legitimate things coworkers have said to me in meetings, one-on-one meetings, via email and on the phone over the past 3 years. I think there needs to be the same button that you have in Taboo, when you say the “no-no” words on the topic card? Someone says something to the effect of “we tried that before” and they should get buzzed. Unless you are going to say “we tried that before, here were our barriers, here is my idea how to move past them and make this approach successful”… save it! You are not adding anything to the table except negativity. Take your negativity and get to walking.

Don’t you remember your very first day at your “grown up job”? You were excited and optimistic.

You didn’t know about the drama…you didn’t know that your coworkers would end up acting as mature as second graders.

It’s important.. correction… IMPERATIVE…to foster that newness… that bright-eyed-bushy-tailed feeling from the day you had your I.D. badge picture taken.

It’s easier said than done. The more you’re exposed to negativity, the more your optimism shield may start to disintegrate.

There’s one thing to really keep in mind: you’re allowed to have a bad day.  Unless you’re a super hero, you’re not going to save the world every single day. However, you’ll have moments of greatness that’ll get you through the other times where yes, you indeed need to spend 4 hours [insert mind numbing topic here].

Regardless of how terrible your situation, challenge yourself to stay positive.

When someone starts to complain about corporate life or about, in my world, doctors, listen… but don’t commiserate with them. Let them vent, some people (including you) need that occasionally. The tactic that works better than simply adding to the list of “things at work that piss me off,” is to listen, empathize and maybe offer some advice. That way your coworker is able to let out their frustrations as well as find some clarity.

Never let anyone tell you to not be ambitious, always be ambitious. If you fail, you learn. If you do fail, try to figure out why something failed and maybe come up with a few ideas to make it better the next time.

If not, 20 years from now you’ll be sitting in a board room and a 20 something with a fresh I.D. badge will start to say that they want to start a project and your response will be… “We tried that before.”

Then, your 20 something self will want to kick you in the ass.

So what’s the point here?

Foster the newness and continue on the road of optimism. Your optimistic, 40-something year old self will appreciate that you started practicing that a long time ago.

Colleen Garvin is a 25 year old manager, working at a Children’s Hospital in Quality Improvement. Her coworkers like to remind her that they have children her age and older! She’s learned that age discrimination is definitely something most recent-grads will face…but she’s certainly dealing with it well. Follow her on Twitter @ColGarv.

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